WHAT TO SPROUT?

Generally, all edible grains, seeds or legumes can be sprouted. Usually, this following are used

Seeds: alfalfa, radish, fenugreek, carrot, coriander, pumpkin, musk- melon, water-cress etc.

Legumes: green gram, ben gal gram, moth, groundnut, peas, soyabean etc

Here, special mention must be made of the following outstanding examples:

Alfalfa:

King of all sprouts. Rich source of min­erals and vitamins A, B, C, E and K and amino acids. Sesame, vitamins E, B com­plex, calcium and other live nutrients.

Groundnut:

Very rich source of proteins. Contains more protein than meat, about two and a half times more than eggs & far more than any other vegetable food except soyabean and yeast. It is best to eat groundnut after it has been soaked over-night.

Soyabean:

It is the most complete protein food.

It is a great source of lecithin which is known to disperse deposits of fatty materials in certain vital organs.

Soyabean can completely replace the use of animal proteins.

 

HOW TO SPROUT ?

The process of sprouting is very easy.

Good variety of seeds should be used. Seeds are washed and rinsed so that any toxic chemicals used on the seeds are removed. The seeds or legumes are then soaked in a container of clean water. The container should be covered in a manner which allows enough air to enter it, and placed in a slightly warm place. After 8 to 12 hours, the water should be drained off. It should be ensured that the container is big enough to allow space for the sprouts to grow. The seeds should be washed two to three times a day, and each time the water should be drained off completely. The sprouts should not be left soaked in water, or else they will start rotting.

The seeds should sprout at least half an inch before being consumed raw. Generally, sprouting process can take two to three days depending on the seeds temperature and humidity. For example green gram takes short time, whereas alfalfa takes long time to sprout. Water, air, heat and light controls the process of sprouting. Nowadays, the modem “Sprout Farm” is also available in the market.

For maximum nutritive value, sprouts are best eaten raw. Sprouts can be safely stored in a refrigerator for several days in an air-tight container.

 

GREEN DELIGHT

1 capsicum

1 big apple

3 tablespoons boiled green peas

Few cherries

10-12 black grapes

4 tablespoons alfalfa sprouts

2 cups fresh paneer

1/4 teaspoon freshly powdered pepper

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt, lime and sugar to taste

Chop capsicum, core and chop apple.

Cut the cherries and black grapes in half.

Mix capsicum, green peas, black grapes, alfalfa sprouts, apple and paneer .

Add pepper, salt, lime, sugar, olive oil to the salad and toss well.

Serve with the cherries and a few chopped tulsi leaves as garnishing.

 

AMRUT AAHAR

A COOK BOOK OF UNCOOKED FOOD

SHEHNAZ A. THANAWALA